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The Neapolitan Revolution of 1820 (13 July 1820-7 March 1821) was a short-lived revolution in the Two Sicilies that forced King Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies to accept a constitution. As one of the many revolutions of 1820, the Neapolitan Revolution followed the example of the Trienio Liberal uprising of 1820, with liberal army officers (belonging to the Carbonari secret society) revolting against the king and forcing him to accept a constitutional monarchy. The king, out of fear for his life, twice swore to uphold his constitution, but the constitutional monarchy began to face problems of its own. The moderate liberal landowners began to clash with the radical Carbonari as the people of Sicily launched their own failed insurrection against the government, and Ferdinand appealed to the Quintuple Alliance to assist him in regaining power. The Austrian Empire was more than happy to assist, and Russia, Prussia, and Austria decided, at the Congress of Troppau, that they had the right to intervene in revolutionary countries. After the Congress of Laibach, the Austrians invaded Naples, defeating the Neapolitan army at Rieti on 7 March 1821. The Austrian army then entered the capital of Naples, restoring Ferdinand I and his absolute monarchy.

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