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The 2018 Haitian protests were a series of anti-corruption protests in Haiti which began in 2018 in response to a hike in fuel prices under President Jovenel Moise, whose election in 2015-16 was marred by political violence, low voter turnout, and electoral fraud. The oil crisis began when Venezuela stopped exporting oil to Haiti, and the government's removal of fuel subsidies caused shortages and price hikes. After it was revealed that much of the Petrocaribe loan program's funds had went towards governmental corruption, significant protests broke out across Haiti. These protests were met with violence from pro-government street gangs, including Jimmy "Barbecue" Cherizier's G9 Family and Allies gang, and Port-au-Prince's slums were plagued by rising violence which included street gangs and local self-defense militias. The protests continued into 2020 due to the government's ineffective COVID-19 response, with both unemployed people and underpaid policemen taking part in demonstrations, the latter group clashing with the army. From July 2018 to December 2019, 187 protesters, 44 police officers, and 2 journalists were murdered. In 2021, a new round of protests broke out after President Moise refused to leave office on 7 February, as he claimed that the postponement of the 2015 presidential runoff to 2016 meant that he had a year more in office. On 7 July 2021, a group of 26 Colombian and 2 Haitian-American mercenaries hired by the Haitian expatriate doctor Christian Emmanuel Sanon assassinated Moise at his house, leading to Prime Minister Claude Joseph seizing power for himself and declaring Haiti to be in a "state of siege". He unsuccessfully requested for the United States to militarily intervene in Haiti to restore order, and his legitimacy was also challenged by Joseph Lambert, whom the Senate named acting President, as they were constitutionally entitled to do.

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